Category Archives: Steel and Iron Industry

The Role of Artificial Intelligence in Industrial Automation

To most people, Artificial Intelligence (AI) probably means sci-fi movies with robots and computers performing inconceivable human tasks. While this is partly true, what AI truly brings to the table is enabling machines to carry out intelligent tasks. As the challenges faced by global decision makers skyrocket, there is an urgent need to propel businesses and societies forward using the most modern technology. With the world changing at an unprecedented speed, businesses need to revamp and restructure how machines and humans work. And AI is helping meet those goals. According to Forrester, Cognitive technologies such as robots, artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, and automation will replace 7% of US jobs by 2025.

The Changing Dynamics

The manufacturing sector is characterized by an environment full of uncertainties and evolving dynamics. With ever growing market volatility, manufacturers need to constantly innovate, adapt and respond to changes in the quickest time, without hampering the quality of products, and at the least possible cost. The efficiency of a manufacturing system closely depends on how well shop floor processes respond to changes. Critical shop floor functions such as production scheduling and maintenance have to be extremely responsiveness, and their integration is what will result in an optimal and robust decision making environment.

AI in Manufacturing

AI finds application in a host of industries including gaming, banking, retail, commercial, and government, and is slowly becoming pervasive in the manufacturing sector, facilitating the automation of industries. AI-driven machines are paving an easier path to the future by providing a host of benefits – offering new opportunities, improving production efficiencies, and bringing machine interaction closer to human interaction. The Fourth Industrial Revolution is being driven by the automation of knowledge-based work; by creating new ways to automate tasks, we can restructure the way humans and machines live and interact, to create a better, stronger digital economy.

AI helps overcome many inherent challenges that have been plaguing the industry: from scarcity of expertise, to decision complexity, integration issues, and information overload. Adopting AI on the shop floor enables businesses to completely transform their processes. Let’s look at what AI is helping the manufacturing sector to achieve:

• Process Automation: The use of AI and robots is particularly appealing in industrial manufacturing as they revolutionize mass-production. Robots are capable of doing repetitive tasks, streamlining the production model, increasing capacity, building automation solutions eliminating human error and delivering higher levels of quality assurance.

• Round-the-clock Production: While humans are forced to work in 3 shifts to ensure continuous production, robots can enable a nonstop, 24/7 production line. Businesses can augment their production capabilities and meet the growing demand of customers worldwide.

• Safer Working Conditions: With several mishaps happening on the shop floor, a shift towards AI means fewer people are have to carry out dangerous and overly laborious work. As robots replace humans and perform mundane and risky tasks, the number of workplace casualties will plummet all across.

• New Opportunities for Humans: As AI takes over the shopfloor and automates boring and mundane human tasks, workers will get to focus on complex and innovative tasks. While AI takes care of menial labour, humans can focus on driving innovation and steering their business to newer heights.

• Reduced Operating Expenditure: Although bringing AI onto the shopfloor would require a massive capital investment, the ROI is substantially higher. As intelligent machines start taking care of day-to-day-activities, businesses can enjoy significantly lower overhead.

Benefits

AI and industrial automation have progressed considerably in recent years. Development in machine learning techniques, advances in sensors and the growth of computing power have helped create a new generation of robots. AI helps enables machines to collect and extract knowledge, recognize patterns, and learn and adapt to new situations or environments through machine intelligence, learning and speech recognition. Using AI, manufacturers can:

• Make faster, data driven decisions

• Enable better production outcomes

• Improve process efficiency

• Lower operational costs

• Enable greater scalability

• And facilitate product innovation

Improving Business Outcomes

The key driver of the Fourth Industrial Revolution is the speed at which it is happening. With technology now at our fingertips, businesses (and even industries) can scale up with the blink of the eye, ultimately changing the way we live our daily lives (and in a fraction of the time). Using AI, industry leaders and technology pioneers can create the right platforms and solutions, ultimately improving business outcomes and driving success in today’s ever-growing digital economy.

Industrial Applications of GPS Trackers

Heavy Vehicle Guidance

The mining and constructions industries today rely very heavily on GPS monitoring, tracking and navigational data and this is primarily because highway constructions, surveyors and marker pegs have been replaced with in-cabin vehicle guidance and control systems for excavators, graders, bulldozers and road paving machines.

These modern and advanced specialty vehicles enable their highly trained drivers to program their vehicles to respond to pre-programmed site plans, thereby enabling the vehicles to achieve close tolerance parameters for position, level and gradient. GPS technology is specifically integrated for high-precision applications in open-cut mines such as vehicle and equipment tracking and mine asset management. In such hi-technology integrational applications, GPS critical data is acquisitioned and decoded by sophisticated IT systems and meshed with other engineering applications to provide multifunction guidance and control. Companies that have integrated their vehicles and mine management systems include Leica Geo-systems, Topcon Positioning Systems and Trimble / Caterpillar.

Surveying, Mapping and Geophysics

Advanced GPS survey-grade technology utilize L1 and L2 signal frequencies to position survey markers, buildings, bridges, airports, harbors, railway stations and various other large infrastructures. This technology is also used to determine aerial mapping, terrain data, through the Geographical Information System (GIS) applications.

GPS is widely used in the acquisition of terrain and aerial mapping data, sensitive physical formations such as volcanoes and earthquake fault lines and the tracking / monitoring of seismic and incipient activities. This important seismic data is transmitted to TV and other news channels for early warnings to the public so that adequate precautionary measures are taken well in time.

Telecommunications

One of the major highlights in the characteristics of GPS satellite technology is the accuracy, reliability and stability in the synchronicity of its technology and this has proven to be very compatible for telecommunications applications. It has been observed that GPS synchronized technology enables adequate synchronization of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) time through the resolution of signals from discrete atomic clocks at specified locations. Although ground-based Chip Scale Atomic Clocks (CSAC) are quite accurate for this purpose, the synchronization of the CSACs is rather problematic without the GPS satellite technology.

Financial Services

As the local and international markets are fast globalizing, the global finance system that enables, governs, schedules and prioritizes digitalized monetary transactions, funds transfers and audit trails is becoming more and more contingent upon high precision time systems. Today, 80% of the millions of daily global retail transactions are done through credit and debit cards. GPS satellite technology integrates perfectly with on-board atomic clocks in order to allow high-speed and high precision local and global transactions.

Moving Street and Industrial Lighting Technology Into the Twenty First Century

With the energy crunch hitting most countries of the world, providing street lighting to the public could drain away quite a bit of revenue as well as fossil fuels required to keep them lit. The use of the old and traditional street light fittings are not helping much, because they are inefficient and generate a lot of heat. This heat is energy which is wasted, leading to increased energy costs as well as depletion of fossil fuels. Fortunately, there are newer and more energy-saving light fittings and bulbs that are available in the market, which gives out better light while consuming less power.

New Generation

In many places of the world, it is the mercury lamps that are the most common form of street lighting that is used and was slowly replaced by sodium vapor lamps. However, in an attempt to reduce imports of expensive crude oil for generating power, more and more countries including China, are slowly replacing their old-style lamps with the newer LED lights. The light fitting that is most commonly used as replacement is the LED flood light fixture which has taken off in many countries around the world, mainly due to the low energy consumption as well as the bright light it provides. The latest generation of LED bulbs has been found to be very proficient in converting energy to light without any heat wastage, which used to be a big drain on power.

Flicker-Free Lighting

To put into perspective, the energy which is emitted as light from a 10-watt LED bulb is the lumen equivalent of a 60-watt incandescent bulb. Additionally, they last much longer, saving you a lot of money in the long run. These LED lights have become very popular in factories, industries, and places were security is paramount; they can be used for general lighting as well as on factory floors. One model of light fitting that is very popular especially in many areas of industry is the LED High Bay light fixture; this fitting is usually placed in an elevated position, typically around 25 feet in height, to illuminate large areas. These LED light fittings provide a very strong diffused light which is not focused; the light provided does not have any glare or flickering usually associated with fluorescent lights.

Cool Light Housings

LED lights consume around a quarter of the energy used by fluorescent lights, yet emit about 120 lumens per watt, making it a an excellent and efficient light source. In places where the energy supply is erratic with sudden surges, LED lights have been found to be perfect, as many of the fittings have inbuilt surge and thermal protectors. LED lights take some time to get warmed up, but they will emit bright light without inducing any flickering with the added benefit of remaining cool. These LED lights are provided with a special light housing, usually made from aluminium, making them the perfect solution to install in streets, where they can work for long periods without needed any maintenance.

During Industrial Revolution 4.0 Era, Palm Oil Plantation Have to Implement Digital Technology

At this time the world is in the era of the 4th Industrial Revolution (Industry 4.0) which is characterized by the implementation of artificial intelligence, super computer, big data, cloud computation, and digital innovation that occurs in the exponential velocity that will directly impact to the economy, industry, government, and even global politics.

The Industrial Revolution 4.0 is characterized by a smart industrialization process that refers to improved automation, machine-to-machine and human-to-machine communication, artificial intelligence (AI), and the development of sustainable digital technology.

Industrial Revolution 4.0 is also interpreted as an effort to transform the process of improvement by integrating the production line (production line) with the world of cyber, where all production processes run online through internet connection as the main support.

Road Map to Industrial 4.0 in Palm Oil Industry

In Indonesia the application of industry 4.0 is expected to increase productivity and innovation, reduce operational costs, and efficiency that led to increase the export of domestic products. In order to accelerate the implementation of Industry 4.0, Indonesia has developed a roadmap for industry 4.0 by establishing five manufacturing sectors that will be a top priority in its development, including food and beverage industry, automotive, electronics, textiles and chemicals.

The five industry sectors are favored considering that they have shown their great contribution to the national economic growth. For example, the food and beverage industry, especially the palm oil industry, has a market share with growth reaching 9.23% in 2017. In addition, the industry also became the largest foreign exchange contributor from the non-oil sector which reached up to 34.33% in year 2017.

The magnitude of the contribution of the food and beverage industry sector can also be seen from the value of exports reaching 31.7 billion US dollars in 2017, even having a trade balance surplus when compared with the import value of only US $ 9.6 billion. This figure also places the palm oil industry as the largest foreign exchange contributor to the country.

In order to increase productivity and efficiency optimally, the technology supporting the industrial revolution 4.0 is imperative to implement, including the implementation of Internet of Things (IOT), Advance Robotic (AR), Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Digitalized Infrastructure (DI).

The structural transformation from the agricultural sector to the industrial sector has also increased per capita income and driven Indonesians from agrarian to economies that rely on an industry-driven value-added process accelerated by the development of digital technology.

In the context of this industrial revolution 4.0, the palm oil industry sector needs to immediately clean up, especially in the aspect of digital technology. This is considering the mastery of digital technology will be the key that determines the competitiveness of Indonesia.

Because if not, then the Indonesian palm oil industry will be increasingly left behind from other countries. If we do not improve our capabilities and competitiveness in priority sectors, we will not only be able to reach the target but will be overridden by other countries that are better prepared in the global and domestic markets.

Digitalization Era in Palm Oil Industry

As a major player in the global palm oil industry, Indonesia needs to clean up soon. Absolute process and operational efficiency is immediately undertaken especially concerning activities involving many manpower such as field work (infield activity) such as crop maintenance, land treatment, fertilizing activity, weeding, harvesting and transporting fruit to weighing and sorting. This is because in this sector there is often time and cost inefficiency.

Digital technology has facilitated a lot of work in the palm oil industry. Now no longer need to make statistical data collected from a number of palm plantations manually. Ease and other advantages of digital technology is able to capture images or photos of fresh fruit bunches, as well as precise location of the garden using a tablet that can access the GPS.

That way, field managers can not only easily track and monitor real-time activity in the garden, but they can also see for themselves the quality of the palm fruit and know exactly which areas are experiencing the problem. And incredibly, it does not need their presence on the field.

In addition to the ease of transferring data from the field to the Excel sheet on the computer and also making reports on the quality of the palm fruit, digitization also facilitates in recording the presence of employees and field workers to then process the data for the purposes of remuneration and incentives.

How Is the Automotive Industry Handling the New Industrial Revolution?

Bill Gates is alleged to have once quipped that “If GM had kept up with technology like the computer industry has, we would all be driving $25 cars that got 1,000 MPG.” Even though the authenticity of this quote is questionable, it has been circulated throughout the internet for years because there is something about the sentiment that rings true to us. It certainly does not seem that the automotive industry has kept up with advancing technology the way that the computer industry has.

This may be due in part to the manufacturing infrastructure that has evolved over the years. Making sweeping upgrades to equipment and/or processes seems a very expensive and risky proposition. When you couple this with the fact that many automobile manufacturers today struggle to find enough demand for their current supply, it is easy to understand why keeping up with the latest technology isn’t always a top priority.

The problem with this reluctance, though, is that automobiles are not inexpensive consumables that people buy casually. Customers expect vehicles to come with the highest standards of safety and efficiency. Customers expect the latest technology possible. How can manufacturers keep up with this demand for innovation without changing their processes?

It seems that some manufacturers are beginning to embrace the ways of the modern industrial world, and are finding ways to align their business models with the current wave of interconnectivity and streamlined automation.

Honda Manufacturing of Alabama

Honda’s largest light truck production facility in the world – a 3.7 million square foot plant – was faced with a problem all too common to large manufacturing facilities. Over the years, a number of different automation systems were introduced to help streamline production. With operations including blanking, stamping, welding, painting, injection molding, and many other processes involved in producing up to 360,000 vehicles and engines per year, it is not surprising that they found themselves struggling to integrate PLCs from multiple manufacturers, multiple MES systems, analytic systems, and database software from different vendors.

Of course, on top of these legacy systems, Honda continued to layer an array of smart devices on the plant floor and embed IT devices in plant equipment. The complexity introduced by this array of automation systems turned out to be slowing down the operations they were intended to streamline.

After reorganizing their business structure to merge IT and plant floor operations into a single department, Honda proceeded to deploy a new automation software platform that enabled them to bring together PLC data with the data coming from MES and ERP systems into a common interface that allowed the entire enterprise to be managed through a single system. This also allowed Honda to manage and analyze much larger data sets that revealed new opportunities for further optimization. While this reorganization required a significant investment of resources, they were able realize benefits immediately, and ultimately positioned themselves to maintain a competitive edge through the next decade or more.

Ford Motor Co.

Ford Motor Company operates a global network of manufacturing operations, and have had difficulty when trying to promote collaboration and share best practices between their various plants. They found a solution using technology based on the Google Earth infrastructure.

Ford was able to develop a cloud-based application that stores 2D and 3D representations of Ford’s global manufacturing facilities, and allows users to navigate through these virtual environments, place pins, and upload video, images and documents to these pins that are shared throughout Ford’s global operations. Engineers and operators can share information about current plant conditions and procedures, which can be accessed in real time from anywhere in the world. The accumulated data can be used for training or to update standard procedures. By creating a global collaborative tool, Ford has created a means of ensuring that each and every one of their employees has the latest, most accurate information on how to best perform a particular task or how to avoid a problem that was encountered elsewhere.

We will have to see in coming years whether or not these innovations will lead to improved market performance for either of these manufacturers, but in the meantime it is probably safe to expect other companies to follow suit. With the advances in manufacturing technologies and machine-to-machine communication, it is becoming very difficult to remain competitive without playing by the same rules as everyone else. Industrial technology has advanced to the point that we are experiencing what people refer to as a new industrial era – or Industry 4.0. Reluctance is no longer a viable option.

A Passionate Affair

Paperweights debuted in 1845, and became a successful fad because of the many changes that occurred in the economic and social conditions of the time. In the mid 1800s, Europe and America were undergoing the Industrial Revolution. It resulted in an emerging “middle-class”, along with a strong demand for colorful and showy decorative arts.

Developing industrial technology and the improved transportation network resulted in lower costs of manufacturing. One of the products to benefit was paper, which we consider insignificant today. However, prior to the 19th century, paper was very expensive, and affordable only to the affluent. In the early 19th century, manufacturing improvements resulted in a significant reduction in the production cost of paper, which in turn, fueled an expansion of printing newspapers and books.

Public literacy blossomed as education became more accepted for the emerging middle-class. Paper products such as envelope and stationery became affordable, and postal service had just begun in many countries. These factors combined to make writing to family, friends and loved ones a very fashionable pastime. A strong market developed for desk sets of writing equipment, accessories, and associated novelties, such as paperweights.

This was also a time of extreme sentimentality. Paperweights became a popular gift item to be given to loved ones as a symbol of affection. They were considered to be more charming than valuable, and were prized more for their sentimental symbolism than their cost.

Although many of the techniques for making paperweights were known by the Egyptians since about 100 B.C., no one had considered the placing of a millefiori design in heavy glass hemispheric dome until a paperweight was needed to help control the increasing volume of paper and letters. The first paperweights were made in Europe by Venetians in 1845, but the finest were by the famous French glass houses of Baccarat, Clichy and Saint Louis. Fine paperweights were also made in Bohemia, Britain and Belgium. Production of paperweights peaked in Europe about 1851, and then sharply declined from 1855 – 1860. During the 10 years of the so-called “Classic Period” (1845-55), it is estimated that only about 50,000 fine paperweights were made in Europe. This is a difficult number to confirm, since production figures were not retained.

America typically trailed Europe in commerce and consumer goods during the 19th century by at least a decade, and paperweights were no exception. Paperweights were made in America as early as 1852, but in 1853 they became better known because of the Clichy exhibit at the New York Crystal Palace Exhibition that year.

Nevertheless, American paperweights became commonplace during the 1860’s when the American market for them was strong. Most of the American glassworkers were European immigrants already skilled in the art, which explains why early American weights are imitative of the European style. The better American weights were made from 1852 to 1890, primarily by the New England Glass Company and the Boston & Sandwich Company, with limited production by Gillinder & Sons and Mount Washington Glass Co. In the later years of the period, paperweights were made by Dorflinger Glass Works and the Whitall Tatum Company.

Industrial Microwave and RF Heating is Green Technology

Industrial Microwave heating and Industrial Radio Frequency heating are well established technologies for industrial process heating. They have typically been used in applications with demanding requirements such as close temperature tolerances or processing in specialized environments. Traditional process heating has relied on natural gas or steam derived from oil or coal fired boilers. In the past, these have been the most economical methods with conventional electric heat being considerably more expensive. Environmental regulations are forcing a shift in this paradigm. The cost per BTU of heat will continue to rise as fuel prices increase.

However, what fuel is used, how efficiently it is applied and the amount of carbon released at the user determine the ultimate cost. Microwave or RF heating offers the user a multitude of advantages in the changing world of process heating. Microwave and RF heating are efficient. Unlike other methods (including electric) the heat required for the process is developed within the processed materials themselves. The losses incurred in transferring the energy into the product are very low. Microwave and RF energy are capable of penetrating materials of poor thermal conductivity. Instead of prolonged heating in a conventional system waiting for external heat to “soak” into the product, heating begins immediately through the entire product as soon as power is applied. This dramatically reduces energy usage by shortening process times and eliminating the need to keep the energy input to the system at process levels when not needed.

Virtually no warm-up is required. In many applications Microwave and RF energy can be targeted at a specific component or material within a product producing heat only where it is needed through a process known as selective heating. Industrial Microwave and Industrial Radio Frequency equipment emit no greenhouse gasses whereby eliminating the need for air quality monitoring, fines and penalties from outdated or malfunctioning combustion systems. Not all industrial heating applications are suitable for Industrial Microwave or Radio Frequency technology, but for many, it offers more heat on target, faster and with less energy usage than any other method.

Vibration Testing Technology

To the savvy maintenance professional, industrial machinery almost “talks” to reveal its condition. The key to success is in understanding what the machine is saying. To detect problems, the professional “listens” in many ways: With eyes and ears, to see and hear conditions that may indicate problems and…

• With thermometers and thermal imagers, to detect overheating, poor electrical connections or failing bearings

• With digital multimeters and power analyzers, to diagnose electrical problems

• Using techniques like lubricant analysis, to gauge machine condition over time

And now new vibration testing tools provide the maintenance professional with a valuable new way not just to listen, but to find mechanical problems and fixes: these new troubleshooting tools are engineered to detect and evaluate machine vibration immediately and recommend any needed repairs.

A new kind of troubleshooting tool

Many industrial maintenance teams today work under severe restrictions on money and time. They may not have the resources to train for and implement the typical long-term vibration analysis program. Further, many professionals may think there are only two options for vibration testing; high-end vibration analyzers that are expensive and difficult to use, and low-end vibration pens, which aren’t particularly accurate.

Fortunately, a new breed of vibration-testing tool fills the middle of the category, combining the diagnostic capability of a trained vibration analyzer with the speed and convenience of lower-end testers, at a reasonable price. This type of tool is designed to be not merely a vibration detector, but a complete diagnostic and problem-solving solution, and targeted specifically for maintenance professionals who need to troubleshoot mechanical problems and quickly understand the root cause of equipment condition.

These tools are designed and programmed to diagnose the most common mechanical problems of unbalance, looseness, misalignment and bearing failures in a wide variety of mechanical equipment, including motors, fans, blowers, belts and chain drives, gearboxes, couplings, pumps, compressors, closed coupled machines and spindles.

Not just data, but actionable results

When these new testers detect a fault, they identify the problem, its location and severity on a multi-level scale to help the maintenance professional prioritize maintenance tasks. They may also recommend repairs.

Mechanical diagnosis can begin with the user placing the device’s accelerometer on the machine under test. The accelerometer may have a magnetic mount or can be installed using adhesive. As the machine under test operates, the accelerometer detects its vibration along three planes of movement (vertical, horizontal and axial) and transmits that information to the tester. Using a set of advanced algorithms, the tester then provides a plain-text diagnosis of the machine with a recommended solution.

No training? No problem

Mechanical equipment is typically evaluated by comparing its condition over time to an established baseline condition. Vibration analyzers used in condition-based monitoring programs rely upon these baseline conditions to evaluate machine condition and estimate remaining operating life. System operators must have considerable training and experience before they can determine the meaning and significance of the vibration spectra they detect.

But what about the maintenance pro who isn’t trained in vibration analysis? How do you tell the difference between acceptable vibration, and the kind of vibration that demands immediate attention to service or replace troubled equipment?

Fortunately, extensive experience with mechanical vibration, what it means and how to fix it is built into the advanced algorithms of today’s testers. Now the maintenance professional can quickly and reliably determine the cause of the machine vibration, learn the severity and location of the problem and receive recommendations for repair. It’s all done with the intelligence built into the tester, without the extensive training, monitoring and recording required for typical vibration monitoring programs.

These testers deliver plain language recommendations about what to do next. For equipment maintenance teams hard pressed and on the go, these precise directions are what they need to take action now, maintain mechanical equipment in top shape, and keep facilities productive. One example of this type of tool is the handheld Fluke 810 Vibration Tester (For more information on the Fluke 810, visit http://www.fluke.com/machinehealth).

Automation Technologies And Manufacturing Safety

As a business leader, you have to continually search out ways to increase operational efficiency and throughput, and lower manufacturing costs. Besides improving the productivity and streamlining production processes, the working environment is something that demands special attention from business leaders. It is crucial to ensure safe working conditions and reduce incident rates. This can be a challenge to maintain a balance especially when production and safety are in a constant battle with each other.

Fortunately, industrial automation and safety systems have made major advancements in the past decade. Sophisticated automated machines and control systems have bridged the gap between production and safety. Your job is to make sure that your engineering staff is implementing new technologies correctly.

It is a necessity to have a corporate safety plan focusing on the implementation of plant safety technologies. We need to dig a little deeper in order to understand how an integrated production system can contribute to a company’s overall success. Safety management is supposed to provide a safe workplace for employees, whereas, engineering department is tasked with improving the manufacturing process. We cannot separate these disciplines as they are interconnected.

Most of the traditional machine guarding systems are simple in design and do not require an engineering background to implement or understand them. However, traditional machine safeguarding techniques are limited in scope. Modern automation and engineering safety controls are intelligent enough to automatically change the safeguarding methods depending on current hazards.

What if the safety system at your production facility were intelligent enough to allow safe human interaction for tasks that are repetitive, routine, and integral? An intelligent safety mechanism can help you improve the productivity of workers and lower the injury risks. It can have a big impact on your bottom line. The advanced industrial technology offers capabilities necessary to develop an integrated manufacturing process where manufacturers can maintain a balance between safety and production.

The advanced integrated technologies are more complicated than traditional safeguarding devices. The use of safety-rated devices can unknowingly create an unsafe environment where safety is nothing but an illusion. Even the advanced safeguarding solutions come with the risk of creating a dangerous work environment. Therefore, it is important to have skilled engineers who can implement and maintain modern machine safeguarding systems.

If you are not satisfied with the current safety conditions at your production plant, consult an engineering company that can design a better safety plan for your manufacturing unit.

Automation Technologies for Manufacturing Safety

As a business leader, you must continue to look for ways to improve operational efficiency and throughput, and reduce production costs. In addition to increasing productivity and expediting the production process, the work environment is something that demands special attention from business leaders. It is important to ensure safe working conditions and reduce the incidence rate. This can be a challenge to maintain balance especially when production and safety fight each other constantly.

Fortunately, industrial automation and safety systems have made major advancements in the past decade. Sophisticated automated machines and control systems have bridged the gap between production and safety. Your job is to make sure that your engineering staff is implementing new technologies correctly.

It is a necessity to have a corporate safety plan focusing on the implementation of plant safety technologies. We need to dig a little deeper in order to understand how an integrated production system can contribute to a company’s overall success. Safety management is supposed to provide a safe workplace for employees, whereas, engineering department is tasked with improving the manufacturing process. We cannot separate these disciplines as they are interconnected.

Most of the traditional machine guarding systems are simple in design and do not require an engineering background to implement or understand them. However, traditional machine safeguarding techniques are limited in scope. Modern automation and engineering safety controls are intelligent enough to automatically change the safeguarding methods depending on current hazards.

What if the safety system at your production facility were intelligent enough to allow safe human interaction for tasks that are repetitive, routine, and integral? An intelligent safety mechanism can help you improve the productivity of workers and lower the injury risks. It can have a big impact on your bottom line. The advanced industrial technology offers capabilities necessary to develop an integrated manufacturing process where manufacturers can maintain a balance between safety and production.

The advanced integrated technologies are more complicated than traditional safeguarding devices. The use of safety-rated devices can unknowingly create an unsafe environment where safety is nothing but an illusion. Even the advanced safeguarding solutions come with the risk of creating a dangerous work environment. Therefore, it is important to have skilled engineers who can implement and maintain modern machine safeguarding systems.

If you are not satisfied with the current safety conditions at your production plant, consult with an engineering company that can design a better safety plan for your manufacturing unit.